Binary Domain
Features Regular Features

In Case You Missed It – Binary Domain

Sometimes a game just slips under the radar. Whatever the reason for this occurring, be it bad marketing, classification problems or a strange concept, some games just fail to find their audience. Here at Player2.net.au we want to highlight these rough gems and that is where “In Case You Missed It” comes in. Some games just deserve a second chance.

In Case You Missed It – Binary Domain

Every year there are surprise games. Games that come out of nowhere and give players a shock as to how good they actually are. In 2012 a game that fits this bill was a cover based shooter called Binary Domain.

Binary Domain, at its core is a Gears of War style cover shooter. But leaving the description at that would be doing the game and injustice. The game starts with the player and his partner infiltrating a futuristic Japan. They are part of a “Rust Crew”, soldiers put together to investigate and stop breaches of the international robotics code, specifically the research in to robots that look and act like humans. These robots or “hollow men” have been found in the USA and are suspected to have been made in Japan, hence the infiltration. After a short while the player meets the rest of the crew and continues with the mission of getting evidence of these “hollow men” and capturing the man responsible.

Binary Domain

The gameplay is similar to just about every cover based shooter with a few notable exceptions. The first difference is the tactical teamwork. You can order your team mates to do certain actions like fire, regroup or charge by using the LB on your controller. This adds a nice element of strategy to the mix enabling the player to set up roadblocks, flanking manoeuvres and sneak attacks by using the squad effectively.  There is also the option to command the team with your voice but the implementation of this is touchy at best so you are better off sticking with the controller.

The efficiency of the players’ team depends on their level of trust with the player. Trust is measured using Binary Domain’s other touted innovation, the consequence system, and unlike the voice recognition this works very well.  The player’s actions in the game directly affect how much squad mates trust. Agree with a squad mates opinion, perform well in combat or revive a team member and trust will increase. Disagree with a mate, shoot them accidentally or force them to do something against their will and trust will decrease. The benefits of trust are simple. A team mate that trusts you will perform better in combat, follow your orders without question and offer tactical advice. The reverse is true if there is no trust. Team mates will ignore you and fail to revive you if you fall. It encourages the player to act like a true leader and get the best out of their squad. The system never quite reaches its full potential but it is certainly a fun addition to the game.

Binary Domain

The shooting is weighty and satisfying; players face a multitude of robot adversaries from basic grunt types, to ninja Shinobi bots to epic boss battles. All are fun to face and take down; shooting armour and limbs of the robots is a joyful experience. The boss battles especially are awe inspiring with the team of four taking on some truly mammoth robots in tense and exciting battles.

Binary Domain is the perfect antidote for those suffering from a lack of grand action in their lives. It is easy to place this game in the same category as games such as Vanquish it it would be easy to recommend to fans of that game. In all Binary Domain is a surprising package that will have players enjoying their shooting from beginning to end. The game can be purchase for a measly sum on Steam or in pre-owned bins for the PS3 and Xbox 360. Here is hoping it is added to the backwards compatibility list soon.

Binary Domain

Matt Hewson

If you have a suggestion for “In Case You Missed It” don’t be shy. Let us know in the comments or on Twitter/Facebook and we may just make it the focus of our next entry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.